Solutions for Athletes

Menifee Maniac MMA Fighter
MMA Fighter “Menifee Maniac”-Fernando Gonzalez

Reach Your Peak Performance Faster!

Competitive cyclists, runners, triathletes, tennis players, MMA fighters, motor sports racers, hockey players (and many other athletes) consistently report having more power to use in their activity with much less effort.

Jim “JC” Chapman of CVAC Systems, Inc., an advanced practitioner of the CVAC technology says, “my athletes notice that they are not as tired after their workouts; and they are able to hit their workouts harder.”

How does this happen?

We believe it is the improved oxygen utilization and glycolytic energy production combined with enhanced recovery that they all get from taking CVAC Sessions.

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Elite athletes CVAC

Improve your performance and endurance naturally and faster by improving your recovery

The work and the recovery occur in sequence within the 20-minute CVAC Session. While your body’s cellular energy-making machine is being enhanced, your body is also receiving assistance in eliminating the waste products naturally produced during past intense workouts. Your body’s pipes are cleaned, allowing easier elimination of waste production in the next intense exercise session.

How about less wear and tear on your body?

The increased physical workload of your exercise or athletic activity causes the parts of the cell that create energy to become stronger and more efficient. Your energy output for use during future activity is improved; however, increased physical workload can often be accompanied by muscle tearing, joint stress, and lactic acid build up.

The CVAC Process creates an atmospheric workload that challenges the body to natural and tolerable stresses.  Since the CVAC Process exposes the body to changes in pressure that set up waves of tension and resolution, CVAC sessions allow an athlete to continue to gain improvement in energy production on the days he/she needs to rest to avoid overtraining.

Is the CVAC Process like altitude training?

We recognize that endurance athletes often engage in altitude training; however, that training differs greatly from the adaptation-based conditioning of the CVAC Process.

In the CVAC Process, dynamic changes in pressure are applied to fresh room air only. The hypoxic stress component of the CVAC Process is brief, transient, and pulsatile. By contrast, nitrogen tents, a popular form of “altitude training” use static, long-term exposures to unnaturally lowered oxygen concentrations.

Recovery is Key

The increased physical workload of your excersize or athletic activity causes the parts of the cell that create energy to become stronger and more efficient. The CVAC Process creates an atmospheric workload that challenges the body allowing an athlete to continue to gain improvement.